1931 Marmon Sixteen Convertible Sedan

1931 Marmon Sixteen Convertible Sedan

0.00

Marmon Motor Company started building cars in 1902 establishing a reputation as an engineering pioneer. High profile events added to the brand’s allure when a Marmon won the first Indianapolis 500 in 1911 and another broke “Cannonball” Baker’s coast-to-coast speed record in 1916. Sales grew until the Great Depression when Marmon announced a line of V-16 powered luxury cars for the 1931 model year. Cadillac beat it to market with its own V-16, and General Motors proved better equipped to weather the economic downturn. Marmon fully invested in the Sixteen, dropping its better-selling lines, but the luxury automobile market shrank and Marmon would close its doors after the 1933 model year.

The original owner of this Marmon was Dr. G.H.A. Clowes, the head of research for the Eli Lilly Company who was responsible for the development of insulin as a treatment for diabetes. Factory options included a radio and front and rear heaters. It later spent time in the museums of Briggs Cunningham, known for his involvement in Le Mans motor racing and the America’s Cup, and noted Indiana collector S. Ray Miller. A multiple award winner, it is regarded as one of the finest and most historically significant Marmons.

  • YEAR & MAKE - 1931 Marmon
  • SERIES - Sixteen
  • MODEL/BODY/STYLE NUMBER - 145 
  • BODY TYPE - 4 Door Convertible Sedan
  • BODY BY - LeBaron
  • # CYLS. - OHV V-16
  • TRANSMISSION TYPE & NUMBER - 3-Speed Manual Synchromesh, Rear Wheel Drive
  • WEIGHT - 5,360
  • ESTIMATED PRODUCTION - 47
  • HP - 200
  • C.I.D. - 490
  • WHEELBASE - 142
  • PRICE NEW - $5,420
Add To Cart